Roadside Robins

Snow accumulations from yesterday’s storm amounted to approximately 12 inches in the vicinity of Conewago Falls, some areas of the lower Susquehanna valley receiving more.

American Robins were in the process of moving north through the region in abundance just prior to the arrival of our latest “nor’easter”.  When the storm struck in the early morning hours yesterday, their flights were grounded.  After sunrise this morning, hungry robins quickly seized the opportunity to feed using the only open ground available—the edges of cleared roadways, particularly where they pass through woodlots and agricultural lands.  Other migrants use the same strategy, picking and probing the wet soils alongside quickly thawing pavement to search for morsels of sustenance.

Early this morning, an American Robin takes a break from tossing the soil to search for invertebrates along the roadside edge of a snow-covered farm field.
Nearly all of the robins seen today were males, indicating that the migration is still in its early stages with the females yet to come.
A Killdeer feeds on the muddy edge of a thoroughfare bisecting snowy cropland.
This American Robin is one of dozens seen feeding on the steep south-facing slope of a road cut excavated through Gettysburg Formation redbeds.  This little sun-drenched oasis along a sparsely traveled rural road was snow-free by early afternoon, much to the delight of feathered travelers whose weather-induced stopovers will soon come to an end.  The journey will continue.

 

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